preLoad Image preLoad Image
검색 바로가기
주메뉴 바로가기
주요 기사 바로가기
다른 기사, 광고영역 바로가기
중앙일보 사이트맵 바로가기

Agriculture goes urban and high-tech

한글기사보기
POMONA, California (CNN) -- Terry Fujimoto sees the future of agriculture in the exposed roots of the leafy greens he and his students grow in thin streams of water at a campus greenhouse.

The program run by the California State Polytechnic University agriculture professor is part of a growing effort to use hydroponics -- a method of cultivating plants in water instead of soil -- to bring farming into cities, where consumers are concentrated.

Because hydroponic farming requires less water and less land than traditional field farming, Fujimoto and researchers-turned-growers in other U.S. cities see it as ideal to bring agriculture to apartment buildings, rooftops and vacant lots.

"The goal here is to look at growing food crops in small spaces," he said.

Long a niche technology existing in the shadow of conventional growing methods, hydroponics is getting a second look from university researchers and public health advocates.

Supporters point to the environmental cost of trucking produce from farms to cities, the loss of wilderness for farmland to feed a growing world population, and the risk of bacteria along extensive, insecure food chains as reasons for establishing urban hydroponic farms.

However, the expense of setting up the high-tech farms on pricey city land and providing enough year-round heat and light could present some insurmountable obstacles.

"These are university theories," said Jim Prevor, editor of Produce Business magazine. "They're not mapped to things that actually exist."

The roots of hydroponically produced fruits and vegetables can dangle in direct contact with water or be set in growing media such as sponges or shredded coconut shells. Most commercial operations pump water through sophisticated sensors that automatically adjust nutrient and acidity levels in the water.

Hydroponics are generally used for fast-growing, high-value crops such as lettuces and tomatoes that can be produced year-round in heated, well-lit greenhouses.

Fujimoto aims to prepare his students to operate the urban hydroponic businesses that he thinks will gain importance in the future. They sell their lettuces, peppers, tomatoes and other produce to an on-campus grocery store and at a farmers market.
AD
온라인 구독신청 지면 구독신청

중앙일보 핫 클릭

PHOTO & VIDEO

shpping&life

뉴스레터 보기

김민석의 Mr. 밀리터리 군사안보연구소

군사안보연구소는 중앙일보의 군사안보분야 전문 연구기관입니다.
군사안보연구소는 2016년 10월 1일 중앙일보 홈페이지 조인스(news.joins.com)에 문을 연 ‘김민석의 Mr. 밀리터리’(news.joins.com/mm)를 운영하며 디지털 환경에 특화된 군사ㆍ안보ㆍ무기에 관한 콘텐트를 만들고 있습니다.

연구소 사람들
김민석 소장 : kimseok@joongang.co.kr (02-751-5511)
국방연구원 전력발전연구부ㆍ군비통제센터를 거쳐 1994년 중앙일보에 입사한 국내 첫 군사전문기자다. 국방부를 출입한 뒤 최장수 국방부 대변인(2010~2016년)으로 활동했다. 현재는 군사안보전문기자 겸 논설위원으로 한반도 군사와 안보문제를 깊게 파헤치는 글을 쓰고 있다.

오영환 부소장 : oh.younghwan@joongang.co.kr (02-751-5515)
1988년 중앙일보 입사 이래 북한 문제와 양자 외교 관계를 비롯한 외교안보 현안을 오래 다뤘다. 편집국 외교안보부장ㆍ국제부장과 논설위원ㆍ도쿄총국장을 거쳤고 하버드대 국제문제연구소(WCFIA) 펠로우를 지냈다. 부소장 겸 논설위원으로 외교안보 이슈를 추적하고 있다.

박용한 연구위원 : park.yonghan@joongang.co.kr (02-751-5516)
‘북한의 급변사태와 안정화 전략’을 주제로 북한학 박사를 받았다. 국방연구원 안보전략연구센터ㆍ군사기획연구센터와 고려대학교 아세아문제연구소 북한연구센터에서 군사ㆍ안보ㆍ북한을 연구했다. 2016년부터는 중앙일보에서 군사ㆍ안보 분야 취재를 한다.